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Posts for category: Child Health Care

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
July 03, 2019
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Child Care   Physical Exam  

Once your child is born it’s amazing just how quickly they grow and develop. It seems like you blink and suddenly they are talking and walking. During these important milestones it’s also important to have a pediatrician that you turn to regularly to make sure that these developmental milestones are being met and that your child is healthy. After all, if there are any problems you want to find out as soon as possible when early medical interventions can make all the difference.

From the moment your child is born until 2 years old, your pediatrician will most likely want to see them every six months for wellness check ups. After your child turns 2 years old you should still bring them in once a year for a routine physical exam and preventive care. Along with checking your child’s vital signs and monitoring their height and weight your pediatrician will also check hearing, eyesight, respiration, cardiac activity and reflexes.

A physical exam will check all systems of your child’s body to make sure that everything is functioning properly. If your child’s doctor does detect a problem it can be treated immediately. Along with a physical exam your child will also undergo any additional screenings and vaccinations that are necessary for maintaining optimal health.

Furthermore, your pediatrician can also recommend workout routines and appropriate physical activity for your child based on their current health and lifestyle, as well as recommendations on diet, sleeping habits and even their emotional and behavioral health. Even if a pediatrician won’t be able to fully treat all conditions they can still refer your child to a specialist who will be able to handle a specific health problem or injury.

Once a child is old enough to go to school it’s also important that parents schedule their child’s sports physical so that they can participate in physical activity and school sports. An annual sports physical can detect past injuries and other problems that could affect your child’s ability to participate in certain activities.

These physical exams are often mandatory before a child can play school sports; however, even if it isn’t mandatory you should still bring your child in once a year for a comprehensive sports physical to make sure that they are healthy enough for certain physical activity.

Make sure your child is seeing their pediatrician regularly for care, not just when they are sick but also to ward away infections and other health problems. Schedule your child’s next physical exam today.

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
March 20, 2019
Category: Child Health Care
The harder your children play, the harder they might fall. During childhood, fractures and broken bones are common for children playing or participating in sports. While falls are a common part of childhood,
Detecting a Broken Bone your pediatrician in shares important information to help you understand if your child has a broken bone. 
 
If your child breaks a bone, the classic signs might include swelling and deformity. However, if a break isn’t displaced, it may be harder to tell if the bone is broken or fractured. Some telltale signs that a bone is broken are:
  • You or your child hears a snap or grinding noise as the injury occurs
  • Your child experiences swelling, bruising or tenderness to the injured area
  • It is painful for your child to move it, touch it or press on it
  • The injured part looks deformed

What Happens Next?

If you suspect that your child has a broken bone, it is important that you seek medical care immediately. All breaks, whether mild or severe, require medical assistance. Keep in mind these quick first aid tips:
  • Call 911 - If your child has an 'open break' where the bone has punctured the skin, if they are unresponsive, if there is bleeding or if there have been any injuries to the spine, neck or head, call 911. Remember, better safe than sorry! If you do call 911, do not let the child eat or drink anything, as surgery may be required.
  • Stop the Bleeding - Use a sterile bandage or cloth and compression to stop or slow any bleeding.
  • Apply Ice - Particularly if the broken bone has remained under the skin, treat the swelling and pain with ice wrapped in a towel. As usual, remember to never place ice directly on the skin.
  • Don't Move the Bone - It may be tempting to try to set the bone yourself to put your child out of pain, particularly if the bone has broken through the skin, do not do this! You risk injuring your child further. Leave the bone in the position it is in.
Contact your pediatrician to learn more about broken bones, and how you can better understand the signs and symptoms so your child can receive the care they need right away. 
By Northside Pediatrics Associates
February 14, 2019
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: ADHD  

Could your child have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)? The disorder can affect every aspect of your child's life and make it ADHDdifficult to form friendships. Your Conroe, TX, pediatricians, Drs. Ayotunde Faweya and Michael Okogbo of Northside Pediatrics Associates offer strategies and treatments that can help kids with ADHD.

 

What is ADHD?

ADHD is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain and usually begins before children are 7. Although hyperactivity is a common sign of the disorder, some children have a subtype of ADHD and don't experience hyperactivity.

 

What are the signs of ADHD?

Kids who have ADHD can't stop moving. They constantly squirm and fidget, which can cause problems at school, particularly if they leave their seats and wander around the classroom.

In fact, teachers are often the first ones to spot signs of ADHD. Children who have ADHD may daydream when a school subject bores them or forget to turn in completed homework. They may have difficulty following directions, can't resist talking in class or find it hard to concentrate for long periods of time.

ADHD also affects your child's social life and may make it difficult for your child to make or keep friends. Kids who blurt out inappropriate comments, refuse to share, or don't understand social cues often find the social aspects of school especially challenging.

At home, you may notice that your child needs frequent reminders to put away toys or start homework, misplaces belongings or can't sit quietly through a TV show.

 

How is ADHD treated?

Some parents are reluctant to seek treatment for their children because they assume that medication is the only solution for ADHD. Although some kids do find that life is easier if they take medication, many benefit from behavioral therapy and social skills groups that teach children how to control impulsive behaviors and strengthen relationships. Your Conroe, TX, pediatrician can discuss appropriate treatment options for your child during your next visit.

Does your child have several of these symptoms? Call your Conroe, TX, pediatricians, Drs. Ayotunde Faweya and Michael Okogbo of Northside Pediatrics Associates, at (936) 270-8655 to schedule an appointment for your child.

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
November 07, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Sports Physicals  

Sports physicals are like a routine medical exam that assesses your child's physical fitness levels and clears them to safely participate in school sports and athletic activities. Most schools and sports programs will require that children satisfactorily complete a physical before participating in an athletic program. The pediatricians at Northside Pediatrics Associates, Dr. Ayotunde Faweya and Dr. Dora Aguilar, recommend that parents schedule sports physicals with enough time to ensure that the children will be cleared and ready to participate in time for the beginning of the athletic season.

Schedule a Sports Physical in Conroe, TX

A typical sports physical will include a comprehensive medical history as well as a physical exam. Even if your children are healthy or have not suffered from previous injuries, a physical will still be necessary to ensure that they can safely participate in their chosen activity. Sometimes underlying conditions or dormant injuries are not immediately visible or detectable. A physical is also an important precaution in your child's overall health and wellbeing.

What to Expect from a Sports Physical

Here are some of the things the pediatrician will be monitoring and looking for during the physical:

  • Assess cardiovascular health and identify underlying conditions
  • Monitor progress on or signs of injuries like concussions
  • Check blood pressure
  • Follow up on how prior orthopedic injuries are healing
  • Nutrition counseling and monitoring for eating disorders
  • Discuss proper techniques, precautions, and proper use of safety equipment
  • Clear previous athletic restrictions after successful injury rehabilitation

A sports physical will assess reflexes, vital signs, joint and muscle strength, and cardiovascular health. They are usually required once per school year, but follow up screenings may be necessary if there are any health issues or an injury develops.

Find a Pediatrician in Conroe, TX

For more information about sports physicals and other pediatric services, contact Northside Pediatrics Associates today by calling 936-270-8655 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Faweya or Dr. Aguilar.

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
April 13, 2018
Category: Child Health Care
Tags: Burns  

Burn HazardFrom washing up under too hot of water to an accidental tipping of a coffee cup, burns are a potential hazard in every home. In fact, burns are some of the most common childhood accidents that occur. Babies and young children are especially susceptible to burns because they are curious, small and have sensitive skin that requires extra protection. Your child’s pediatrician is available to provide you with tips on proper treatment, and ways to prevent burns.

Understanding Burns

Burns are often categorized as first, second or third degree, depending on how badly the skin is damaged. Both the type of burn and its cause will determine how the burn is treated, but all burns should be treated quickly to reduce the temperature of the burned area and reduce damage to the skin and underlying tissue. 

First-degree burns are the mildest of the three, and are limited to the top layer of skin. Healing time is typically about 3 to 6 days, with the superficial layer of skin over the burn potentially peeling off within the next day or two. Second-degree burns are more serious and involve the skin layers beneath the top layer. These burns can produce blisters, severe pain and redness.

Finally, third-degree burns are the most severe type of burn, which involves all layers of the skin and underlying tissue. Healing time will vary depending on severity, but can often be treated with skin grafts, in which healthy skin is taken from another part of the body and surgically placed over the burn wound to help the area heal.

Prevention

You can’t keep kids free from injuries all the time, but these simple precautions can reduce the chances of burns in your home:

  • Reduce water temperature.
  • Avoid hot spills.
  • Establish ‘no’ zones.
  • Unplug irons.
  • Test food temperature.
  • Choose a cool-water humidifier or vaporizer.
  • Address outlets and electrical cords.

Contact your pediatrician for more information on how to properly care for burns and how you can further protect your children from potential burn hazards.