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Posts for category: Children's Health

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
June 18, 2020
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Vision Test  
Vision TestParents want nothing more than their children to be healthy and happy. This applies to every element of their well-being, including their eyes! Your pediatrician recommends that all children receive a comprehensive eye exam by the age of one. These tests detect any problems that require correction. Prolonging an exam can damage your child’s eyes for life. 
 
When Should My Child’s Vision Be Tested?
Your child should have had several tests done by the age of five. This confirms for your pediatrician that they are developing normally. Follow this recommended time-table: 
  • At birth: this is performed right away on your child, as part of the newborn physical assessment.
  • 6 months: your pediatrician evaluates your child’s eyes at their regular appointment. 
  • 3.5 years old: at your child’s appointment, the pediatrician tests their eyes and also their visual acuity. 
  • 5 years old: a standard assessment performed at a pediatric appointment. 
After this, eye screenings are implemented at your discretion. Your pediatrician will check your child’s eyes at their annual checkup. If your child fails an eye exam, you need to schedule a full pediatric eye evaluation right away. 
 
Another reason you should get your child’s eyes checked is if you have a family history of eye conditions. This is especially true if you have other children that have vision problems.
 
Why Does My Child Need an Eye Exam If They Passed the Vision Screening?
There are certain circumstances where your pediatrician refers your child for a full eye examination. This is common for infants that show signs of a lazy eye or crossed eyes. Other possible red flags in infants are problems tracking objects or a strangely colored pupil. 
 
Is your child struggling in school? Don’t jump to conclusions without an eye examination from your pediatrician. If a child can’t see the board or follow along with lessons, their performance will suffer. Corrective eyewear and other treatment options can help. Eye examinations are even more important for children with learning disabilities. Eye problems can make coping with a learning disorder much harder. 
 
What to Expect at Your Child’s Eye Examination
Your child has nothing to be worried about at their appointment. There is nothing scary or painful! The pediatrician will ask you about your family history, especially anything related to eye health. From there, they check your child’s pupil and muscle function, along with sharpness.
 
In certain cases, your pediatrician will dilate the eyes. This is performed by placing special drops in the eyes. After about forty minutes, the pediatrician can examine the major structures. 
By Northside Pediatrics Associates
June 04, 2020
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Autism  
Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a developmental condition that affects how a person views and interacts with the world around them, including other people. In most cases, differences become apparent by the time your child reaches 24 months. Mainly, parents notice behavioral differences and language delays. If you suspect that your child has ASD, schedule an appointment with your local pediatric office. We work with you to figure out what to do next.
 
Signs of ASD 
Every child with ASD is different. Not everyone will have the same symptoms or experiences. With that in mind, here are some summaries on social, communication, and behavioral differences. 
 
Social Differences
  • Your child doesn’t keep or make eye contact
  • They don’t respond to your facial expressions or smiles
  • Does not reciprocate facial expressions or have the appropriate ones
  • Doesn’t respond to parent’s pointing 
  • Has problems making friends
  • Shows a lack of concern for others
Communication Differences
  • Your child hasn’t spoken by 16 months
  • Repeats or parrots what others say
  • Doesn’t feel the need or want to communicate 
  • Starts missing language and social milestones after 15 months
  • Doesn’t pretend play but does have a good memory for numbers, songs, and letters
Behavioral Differences
  • Has an affinity for routines and schedules and does not like altering them
  • Likes to twirl their fingers, sway, rock, or spin
  • Has strange activities that they enjoy doing repeatedly
  • They are sensitive to sounds, lights, touch, textures, and smells
  • They are more interested in the parts of a toy instead of the whole thing
Common Examples
Don’t feel overwhelmed by the information listed above. As mentioned, a child can have a mixture of any of these behaviors. There are a few other common examples that your pediatrician sees. These give you insight into how a neurotypical child reacts in certain situations versus a child with ASD.  
 
By the age of 12 months, your child should turn their head when they hear their name. A child with ASD won’t respond even if their name is called multiple times.
 
By 18 months, a child with speech delays finds accommodations through gestures, facial expressions, or pointing. Children with ASD find no reason to compensate for speech. 
 
After 24 months, many children enjoy bringing their parents objects or toys to look at or play with. A child with ASD may bring their parent an object but will not play with their parent or respond to their reaction.
By Northside Pediatrics Associates
April 24, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: School physicals  

Pads, goggles and other safety gear aren't the only way to protect your young athlete. Annual school physicals help ensure that your child school physicalsis healthy enough to participate in sports. Your Conroe, TX, pediatrician, Dr. Ayotunde Faweya, offers school physicals at Northside Pediatrics Associates.

Why school physicals are important?

Health problems that can affect your child's ability to play sports safely aren't always apparent. School physicals safeguard your child's health by:

  • Identifying Health Conditions: In addition to checking your child's vital signs, height and weight, your child's Conroe pediatrician will perform a thorough examination and look for signs of certain diseases or conditions, such as diabetes, asthma, heart or lung conditions, scoliosis, joint instabilities, and other issues.
  • Providing Vaccinations: Your child's immunization record will be reviewed during the physical. If he or she needs an immunization, it can be provided during the physical. Immunizations not only protect your child but also protect teammates who can't be vaccinated due to medical conditions.
  • Reducing the Risk of Injury: School physicals offer the perfect opportunity to ensure that your child has healed completely from previous sports injuries. If he or she attempts to return to practice too soon, the injury may worsen and recovery time may take even longer.
  • Providing Solutions: Your child's pediatrician can also recommend treatments and solutions if a health condition is diagnosed. For example, physical therapy might be recommended to help stabilize a joint weakened by a sprain, while more frequent breaks, in addition to inhaled medications, may be suggested if your child has asthma.

The school physical may also include a discussion of the importance of conditioning and wearing safety gear. Your child's pediatrician can offer healthy eating advice and discuss the negative effects of performance-enhancing steroids, drugs, and alcohol on health and athletic performance.

Most children are cleared to play sports after a school physical. If a health problem is diagnosed during the physical, your child may be able to participate in his or her sport after receiving appropriate treatment.

Do you need to schedule school physicals for your children? Call your Conroe, TX, pediatrician, Dr. Ayotunde Faweya of Northside Pediatrics Associates at (936) 270-8655 to schedule your appointment.

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
February 22, 2019
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Immunizations  

How immunizations from your pediatrician in Conroe, TX, can protect your child

There is a lot of information available about immunizations, and you may be asking yourself, are they really that important? The truth is, immunizationschild immunizations are the best way to prevent infectious diseases and serious complications from a medical condition.

Children are among the most vulnerable when it comes to serious complications due to the flu and other conditions. Your pediatricians at Northside Pediatrics Associates in Conroe, TX, offers a full range of pediatric services including immunizations to help your child stay healthy.

Immunizations are important because:

  • They prevent your child from getting diseases like meningitis, hepatitis, and flu.
  • They prevent the spread of illnesses and diseases to others, including your child’s playmates, teachers, and members of your household.
  • They are required for your child to attend daycare and school.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that children be vaccinated against hepatitis B at birth. You should plan on bringing your child in at one to two-month intervals until your child is six-months old. After that, regular visits are recommended up to age 18.

The current CDC immunization recommendations are listed below:

  • (Hep B) Hepatitis B
  • (Dtap) Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis
  • (Hib) Haemophilus influenza type B
  • (IPV) Polio
  • (PCV13) Pneumococcal conjugate
  • (RV) Rotavirus
  • (MMR) Measles, mumps, rubella
  • (Varicella) Chickenpox
  • (HepA) Hepatitis A
  • (HPV) Human papillomavirus
  • (MCV4) Meningococcal conjugate
  • (Influenza) Flu

Immunizations are safe and effective. In fact, each vaccine is rigorously tested for both safety and effectiveness and approved by the Food and Drug Administration before it can be released for public use. You can be sure that you are safeguarding your child’s health when you get your child immunized. You can have peace of mind, knowing that your child is protected against serious, and potentially deadly conditions like meningitis, hepatitis, or the flu.

For more information about immunizations and other pediatric care services, call your pediatricians at Northside Pediatrics Associates in Conroe, TX, today!

By Northside Pediatrics Associates
December 17, 2018
Category: Children's Health
Tags: Child Care   Weight  

Maintaining an optimum weight is important for the health of your little one.

It’s never too early to make sure that your child is adopting the best habits for maintaining a healthy weight. After all, with obesity on the rise among our children and teens, it’s so important that we are doing everything we can to keep kids healthy and to prevent serious health problems that can arise as a result of obesity. These habits, along with visiting a pediatrician for regular care and advice on maintaining a healthy lifestyle, can keep your child feeling their best.

If your child is overweight there are certain things you can do to help them lose the weight and to maintain a healthy BMI (body mass index),

 

Lead by Example

Children pick up a lot of their habits from their parents, and it’s certainly much easier to eat in an unhealthy fashion if everyone in the family is. This is the time to truly evaluate the family’s eating habits as a whole. Are your meals healthy, balanced, and nutritious or do you find yourself going out for fast food or heating up prepared meals? If parents make healthier eating choices children are more likely to, as well.

 

Get Active

While we all seem to be glued to electronics these days, it’s important to power down and to get some regular physical activity. This can include joining a school sports team, community sports, or even going out in the backyard and kicking a ball around. Children should get at least 60 minutes of physical activity a day.

 

Choose Healthy Snacks

When your child comes home from school are they rushing to grab cookies, potato chips, or other unhealthy snack items? While these foods can certainly be fun and enjoyable in moderation, they shouldn’t be the norm. Instead of stocking the house with junk food, opt for things like peanut butter or hummus on apples or veggies. If you aren’t sure which kinds of healthy snacks to get, talk to your child’s pediatrician for recommendations and advice.

 

Get Some Shut Eye

It’s important that your child is getting enough sleep each and every night. In fact, children that don’t get enough sleep may actually be more likely to become overweight or obese. Making sure that your child regularly receives eight hours a night is a great way to set them towards a healthy lifestyle.

 

Concerned? Give Us a Call!

If your child is having challenges with their weight it’s important to turn to a pediatrician who can provide you with the most effective and safest methods to help shed the excess weight and to maintain a healthier lifestyle.